Menu

EKINOPS en français

WELCOME TO

EKINOPS BLOG

Fifty Shades of NFV?

fifty_shades_of_nfv

In the racy world of CPE architecture, what virtualization-hungry service providers say they want isn’t always what they need, says Pravin Mirchandani, CMO, EKINOPS.

Alright, perhaps ‘racy’ is going a bit far, but as the virtualization industry moves out of ‘does it work’ and into ‘let’s make it happen’, pulses are certainly starting to quicken. Not least because service providers are having to make tough calls about how to architect their management and orchestration (MANO). Many of these decisions revolve around the deployment of virtualized network functions (VNFs), via some form of customer premises equipment (CPE).

Several ‘shades’ are emerging, each with their advantages and drawbacks.

The ‘NETCONF-enabled CPE’ model emulates what we have today: a fixed number of physical network functions (note: not virtual) are embedded into a traditional L3 multi-service access router. The key difference here is that the router, as its name suggests, supports the NETCONF management protocol and can, as result, be managed in a virtualized environment. In truth, this is a pretty rudimentary form of virtualization; the router can be managed by a next-generation OSS with NETCONF and its embedded physical functions can be turned on and off remotely, but that’s about it. The device is not reprogrammable, nor can its network functions be removed or replaced with alternatives. The market for this deployment model lies in two use-cases: Firstly, as a bridging solution enabling service providers to co-operate traditional and virtualized network services simultaneously, facilitating migration. Secondly, given that many of today’s VNFs are heavy and need considerable amounts of memory and processing resources in order to operate, the more flexible white-box alternatives are costly in comparison. Specialist vendors like OneAccess have been developing dedicated CPE appliances (with embedded PNFs) for years, where compact and efficient code has always been a design goal in order to keep appliance costs under control. For more conservative operators that are keen to get ‘in the game’, the proven reliability and comparative cost efficiency of this model can offset its relatively limited flexibility. Rome wasn’t built in a day and some operators will prefer to nail the centralized management and orchestration piece before investing heavily in pure-play virtualization appliances for the network’s edge.

A purer approach is to invest in a ‘thick branch CPE’ or, in other words, an x86-based white-box solution running Linux, onto which VNF packages can be either pre-loaded and, in the future, removed and replaced or even selected by customers via, say, a web portal. This approach delivers far greater flexibility and is truer to the original promise of NFV, in which the network’s functions and components can be dismantled and recomposed in order to adjust a service offer. The snag, however is that white-box CPEs come at a cost. More memory and more processing power mean more cash. That’s why the race is on to develop compact VNFs, so they can minimize processing requirements and, as a result, enable a limited spec white-box to do more, with less. Again, unsurprisingly, those ahead of the curve are VNF vendors that have the experience of wringing every last drop of performance out of compact and cost-efficient appliances, purpose-designed for operators and service providers.

See full post

Thick & Thin: A Taxonomy of CPEs

taxonomy_cpe

In presentations at virtualization conferences, and in our discussions with operators and service providers, there remains a lot of confusion surrounding the terms ‘thick’ and ‘thin’ as they relate to customer premises equipment (CPE). This is because the terms are used interchangeably, to describe different market segments, the density of network functions as well as the nature of the CPE itself.

The roots of ‘thick’ and ‘thin’ comes from the term ‘thin client’; a popular reference to a lightweight computer or terminal that depends heavily on a server or server farm to deliver data processing and application support. This contrasts with the PC, which performs these roles independently, and was somewhat disparagingly referred to as a ‘fat client’, or, more neutrally, as a ‘thick client’.

This heritage is important as we look to provide a taxonomy of CPEs, which will hopefully aid our understanding of their respective roles in the delivery of virtualized network services.

Generically, CPE or ‘customer premises equipment’ refers to the equipment provided by a service provider that is then installed with its customers. Historically, CPE referred mainly to the supply of telephony equipment, but today the term encompasses a whole range of operator supplied equipment including routers, switches, voice gateways, set-top boxes as well as home networking adapters.

Thick CPE refers typically to a router or switch that provides network functions at the customer premises. There are now three main types:

See full post

Latest News

  • EKINOPS Celebrates MEF Technology Solutions Award Win

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI),a leading provider of open, future-proof and flexible network solutions to service providers, has been recognised with a Technology Solutions Award at the 2019 MEF Awards, which took place during the leading industry conference, MEF19 in Los Angeles.

     
  • EKINOPS and IEC Telecom Group deliver next-generation maritime satellite communication solution

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI), a leading supplier of optical transport equipment and router solutions for network operators, has launched with IEC Telecom Group, one of the leading global providers of managed network communication solutions, OneGate, an agile solution that protects the critical communications functions of maritime vessels.

     
  • EKINOPS to showcase joint SD-WAN Proof of Concept at MEF 2019 together with TELUS and Inmanta

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI),a leading provider of open, future-proof and  fully flexible network solutions to service providers, has been selected by MEF to participate in the sixth annual MEF 3.0 PoC Showcase at leading industry conference, MEF19, which is taking place from 18 to 22 November 2019 in Los Angeles.

     

EKINOPS Worldwide

EKINOPS EMEA & APAC
Telephone +33 (0)1 77 71 12 00

EKINOPS AMERICAS
Telephone 800-670-2618

 

E-MAIL ALERTS

Receive automatically EKINOPS information in your inbox!