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Orchestrating the network beyond the NFVI boundary

orchestrating-the-network-beyond-the-nfvi-boundary

A key promise of SDN/NFV is to enable service providers to offer innovative, on-demand enterprise services with unprecedented flexibility. Building a network capable of delivering flexible, dynamic, customer-tailored services, is however a challenge for service providers. As a matter of fact, end-to-end service orchestration within the virtualized infrastructure and across complex multi-vendor network domains outside the NFVI is anything but a walk in the park.

Standardization bodies, the acceptance of open source solutions and service provider led programs such as AT&T Domain 2.0, Orange SDN for Business or Deutsche Telekom Terastream have driven interoperability in the NFVI and MANO spheres. One major roadblock to capture the full potential of network virtualization is the orchestration of network elements beyond the NFVI boundary, in order to provide full service delivery automation across the network. Yet one key question is how can orchestrators work with networking elements outside the NFVI? As service providers look to transform their networks, the answer to this question is crucial in order to deliver end-to-end enterprise managed services.

The challenge for the orchestrator is to configure all the nodes in the service delivery chain from the customer premises to the NFVI and steer the traffic to the virtual service platform. This integration work across multi-vendor network domains can be substantial as many network devices have to be configured and managed, often with specific proprietary interfaces. Nevertheless, the development of vendor equipment adapters in the orchestration platform to cope with proprietary CLI and varying administration protocols is a prospective cost that industry players want to avoid and is based on a short term view of the problem.

Verizon’s white paper on its SDN/NFV strategy confirms that cross-domain and cross-vendor programmability is key to meet the dynamicity promised by SDN/NFV services. In order to replace a myriad of element management systems (EMS) tied to network elements with proprietary protocols and interfaces, Verizon recommends in the near term to use domain-specific SDN controllers to manage vendor-specific network elements.

Looking at the longer-term perspective, there is an opportunity to unify a diverse set of provisioning and configuration chains under a common NETCONF/YANG umbrella to simplify integration, operation and maintenance. NETCONF/YANG provides a perfect programmatic interface to prolong the orchestration domain and configure end-to-end service chains on-demand by spawning VNFs in the NFVI and steering traffic according to service requirements across the network.
The significant traction of NETCONF/YANG in the multi-vendor orchestration space makes it a good fit to streamline the integration of end-to-end automated SDN/NFV services. The support of NETCONF/YANG by a number of commercial orchestration platforms (Ciena Blue Planet, WebNMS, Cisco NSO,...) and the standardization of YANG modules by the MEF (Metro Ethernet Forum) for the orchestration of Carrier Ethernet 2.0 services add momentum to an already fast moving trend toward a NETCONF/YANG end-to-end orchestrated network model.

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Ultra-compact VNFs are the key to cost-effective NFV

ultra-compact-vnfs-are-the-key-to-cost-effective-nf

OneAccess’ CMO, Pravin Mirchandani, argues that only the most efficient VNFs will pass the scrutiny of the operator community; the risks and costs of accepting anything different are too high.

The arrival of the software-defined networking era has been enthusiastically welcomed by all as it promises both infrastructure and services that can flex and grow in line with operators’ changing requirements. The question how can we transition to an SDN/NFV based infrastructure as quickly possible? is occupying industry minds, service providers and vendors alike. Anyone with lingering doubts need only consider the recent A&M moves by the industry big guns, Juniper and Cisco, who are feverishly trying to reinvent themselves as born again software businesses.

Virtualized network functions (VNFs), delivered over the NFV infrastructure (NFVI), promise to minimize the operator investments needed to customize future services in line with their operational needs. But, at the moment, the jury is still out on what the killer VNFs are going to be. This question raises new concerns: what VNFs should operators plan for when specifying their white box? How will demand for resources play out over the business cycle? Here carriers are facing some tough decisions; ones that may ultimately determine their ability to compete in a crowded sector. An over-specified white box will waste huge amounts of money and already NFV migration is proving much more costly than first thought. Far worse though is the prospect of under-specification, which would result in a virtualized environment that simply isn’t fit for purpose.

The dilemma for the operators can’t be taken lightly. If they deploy basic bare metal units, the risk is lost revenue when customers, who cannot upgrade when needed, move to an alternative supplier. Most likely, a middle ground will be reached, and attention will refocus on the familiar question of how to get more for less. Those that thought that this question might evaporate as network goes software-centric should prepare for disappointment. Operators will be exerting great pressure on VNF developers to do just this, by creating ultra-compact and efficient software functions, not least, so their choice of white-box stands the best chance of coping with as-yet-unknown future demands.

There are many vendors aiming to position themselves in this space which, it seems, is where the long-term revenue opportunity exists. But if they want to deploy a full catalog of VNFS including functions such as WAN optimization, vCPE, VPN and encryption, for example, carriers need to be conscious that many developers hail from an enterprise background, in which their solutions have operated on dedicated appliances drawing on uncontested computing power. VNF development is a different ballgame altogether - so it will be interesting to see how these modules perform when they are scaled down to share the resources of a single white box.

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Latest News

  • EKINOPS completes the acquisition of OTN technology from Padtec

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI), a leading supplier of telecommunications solutions for telecom operators, today completes the acquisition of the OTN-Switch (Optical Transport Network) platform developed by Padtec, an optical communications system manufacturer based in Brazil.

     
  • A record 2nd quarter with sequential growth of 17%. H1 2019: revenue of €45 million and expected improvement in EBITDA margin

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI), a leading supplier of telecommunications solutions for telecom operators, has published its revenue for the second quarter of 2019.

     
  • EKINOPS Launches Channel Partner Program in EMEA and APAC

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI), a leading supplier of optical transport equipment and router solutions, today announces the launch of the EKINOPS Channel Partner Program (ECPP). The program has been designed to support value-added resellers (VARs) and system integrators to differentiate in the market by providing them with the opportunity to build, sell and deliver solutions tailored to their customer needs, while still benefitting from the Ekinops’ extensive knowledge, resources and expertise.

     

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