Menu

EKINOPS en français

WELCOME TO

EKINOPS BLOG

MP-TCP link bonding protocol offers declining MPLS a much needed life-line

mp-tcp-link-bonding-protocol-offers-declining-mpls-a-much-needed-life-line

Recent work on a new approach to Hybrid Access emerging from one of the industry standards body is likely to be music to the ears of the major carriers who have seen a steady erosion of their market share by the more agile Internet service providers.

Despite the many benefits that an MPLS based VPN connection can offer businesses, particularly in terms of security and SLA guarantees, the major carriers have struggled to prevent customers opting to move some or all of their WAN architecture onto a low-cost, high-speed Internet link and VPN as soon as contracts allow.

To some extent this trend is an understandable consequence of the growth in the uptake of Cloud applications as the basis of corporate communications. Most network managers agree that MPLS is not ideally suited to handling large volumes of traffic and has led to network congestion and performance headaches for IT teams, for which just increasing bandwidth is not necessarily the solution. In addition there are still lots of businesses that choose a hybrid approach to hosting applications with some in the corporate data center and others in the Cloud. This means that moving to an all Internet infrastructure is not going to solve the problem in all cases either.

The obvious answer is to opt for some form of hybrid MPLS/Internet access ecosystem that can provide granular control of all traffic across the WAN and ensure that load can be spread across multiple links based on a range of business priorities and policies. While this approach is great in theory the reality can mean high capex investment in load balancing for a sub-optimal solution.

Application-aware policy-based traffic distribution means any given application/session is restricted to a single link’s bandwidth, which leads to the expensive MPLS being under-utilized without adding any link failure reliability. With cost-saving also a major factor for businesses looking for an alternative to MPLS it is easy to see why some companies decide to go for the pure-play Internet-based option, even at the cost of losing the reputed SLA and security benefits offered by MPLS.
However, recent exciting developments emerging from the Broadband Forum are promising to enable advanced hybrid access functionality to be embedded in the CPE, which is great news for carriers looking to be able to offer customers the type of services they need while retaining their private corporate VPN at an acceptable price-point.

See full post

Thinking ahead: Eradicating downtime needs strategic vision as well as technology

thinking-ahead-eradicating-downtime-needs-strategic-vision-as-well-as-technology

Organizations focused on delivering network connectivity services, from big national telcos to small, regional service providers, are under pressure to reduce network downtime. A recent report from IHS Research(1) highlighted that US organizations are losing as much as $100m per year to the problem. It seems to be a similar story in Europe, too, where network outages are estimated to be costing companies an average of €75.5k per year(2).

Meanwhile, business technologies are evolving at a blistering pace, raising the stakes even further. The steady march into the Cloud, together with the rise of enterprise mobility are increasing network traffic and deepening the enterprise’s dependency on the network. Looking not so far ahead, the surge of un-manned connections from machine-to-machine (M2M) initiatives is set to compound matters. Against this backdrop, communication service providers (CSPs) are making it their mission to futureproof their networks so they can maintain network stability, speed and security as their customer’s demands intensify.

Organizations that manage multiple branches across dispersed geographic locations, like hotel chains, petrol stations and retailers, have multifaceted dependencies. Here, network performance outages can halt the business in its tracks, severing the link through which customers engage, card payments are verified and the supply chain is managed.

One such organization demonstrating ‘best practice’ in network management is Tokheim, a global managed service provider specializing in the retail oil and gas industry, whose purpose-built international network connects 5000 petrol service station customers worldwide. The success of Tokheim’s business rests on the quality of its network.

In 2013, with the future in mind, Tokheim set about evolving its business-critical network to ensure that it could support the fast growing, always-on transaction environment required by its network of branches To meet performance requirements, Tokheim centralized the application infrastructure management functions needed to monitor the variety of networked point-of-sales (POS) devices deployed on its customers’ forecourts. This upgrade delivers a faster, more reliable payment experience to its customers, supporting its efforts to increase market share. Importantly, the organization also delivered PCI-DSS compliant POS connectivity for its real-time transaction processing and, to minimise the risk of network down time, integrated a number of backup options including 3G and secure VPN remote access to networked locations worldwide.

See full post

Packet-based traffic management is the optimum combination for hybrid access protocols

HybridAccess_Blog

As has been highlighted many times, a major focus of attention for vendors like OneAccess continues to be on working on innovations that ensure businesses have reliable high-speed access to their Cloud-based applications.

There can be little doubt that the Cloud is rapidly changing the fundamental nature of computing for businesses large and small. Analysts such as IDC are even going as far as predicting that terms like public and private clouds will eventually disappear from our vocabulary just becoming the de facto standard for business IT provisioning by as soon as 2020.

If IDC is right, the communications’ industry and its supply chain, over the next five years, needs to agree on the standards framework that will ultimately drive the innovation needed to ensure reliable high-speed Cloud access for all businesses and individual users alike. At the moment for some, having a connection that they can depend on can still be a lottery based ultimately on their physical location and local link options.

Application performance and availability are the major factors that are determining the rate of Cloud adoption across the board, with restricted bandwidth and traffic congestion often cited as among the primary reasons for delayed migration. If users cannot be guaranteed that they will not be faced with frequent disruptions and poor quality of experience (QoE) they are unlikely to fully embrace the Cloud in the time-frame that IDC suggests.

In cases where fiber has not yet reached the cabinet (nor is likely to any time soon) the only realistic and viable solution to overcome these objections is to find ways of efficiently aggregating multiple connections to boost the capacity of the available links. There are several multi-path protocols such as IFOM that help boost performance in the Wifi/3GPP mobile networks, but an industry standard approach is yet to fully emerge for the aggregation of Wifi, LTE, xDSL and even broadband satellite links between the CPE and a central hybrid aggregation gateway.

See full post

IoT encryption: A revenue driver for CSPs

IoT

Back in July 2014, an Intel study(1) indicated that 41% of IT managers and directors identified data protection as a key obstacle to overcome before the Internet of Things (IoT) could be fully embraced. 44% cited data encryption as the answer to this problem.

Since then, despite IoT dialogue intensifying, relatively little attention has been given to how IoT data from fleets of connected devices will be secured. Perhaps ‘devices’ is the wrong word. For manufacturing plants, together with hotels, gas stations, retailers and a host of other enterprise beneficiaries, IoT is less about investing in new technologies and more about retrofitting sensors to existing machines and other physical assets.

This matters because IoT sensors have limited processing power and, as a result, are incapable of performing heavy duty computational functions, like encryption. So where does this leave us? We know that encryption is a deal breaker for IT decision makers but, at the same time, it seems beyond reach.

Happily, the solution is also a revenue opportunity for communication service providers (CSPs), and involves encryption being performed at a central point before the data is transmitted across the WAN. After all, the biggest risk to corporate data security does not come from the factory floor, the hotel staff, or the gas station attendant; it comes from the threat of that data being intercepted by a third party as it is being transmitted across the web.

By using a customer premises-based router as a managed service delivery platform, CSPs can centralise all of a customer’s IoT data from across their sites and provide encryption as a service, pre-transmission. What’s more, because the CPE’s functions are managed by the CSP, it is about as tamper-resistant a piece of hardware as the enterprise is likely to find.

See full post

Business Continuity and Quality of Service (QoS): The Keys to CSP Success in the Age of IoT

Internet_of_things_IOT

According to IDC, ‘the IoT opportunity’ for service providers focuses on assembling blended solutions comprising connectivity services, infrastructure, purpose built IoT platforms, app security, analytics and professional services. To succeed communication service providers (CSPs) must focus on Business Continuity and Quality of Service (QoS), explains Pravin Mirchandani, CMO, OneAccess.

By 2020, there will be 26 billion devices connected on the Internet of Things (IoT) across a wide range of vertical sectors. Over the next five to 10 years, almost everything that can be connected will be connected, resulting in staggering year-on-year hikes in IP network traffic. Manufacturing plants, transport and infrastructure providers, energy providers and hospitals together with a host of other enterprises reliant on real-time data streams from multiple, distributed sources have the most to gain, but also the most to lose. By monitoring the real time status of critical devices - on connected busses, trains, planes and ships, for example, or in automated machinery on a manufacturing production line – critical event response times and all their associated costs can be cut dramatically. But if the performance of the IoT network is degraded by data overload then all such benefits will be reversed, resulting in consequences ranging from the inconvenient to the catastrophic.

Telecom and CSP networks, which will carry the lion’s share of IoT data, are already under strain as operators grapple with infrastructure obsolescence and continuing hikes in traffic. Currently, most IoT projects remain either at the proof of concept or pilot stages, but this won’t last. The first generation of commercial deployments are now right around the corner.

For service providers, according to IDC, ‘the IoT opportunity’ focuses on assembling blended solutions comprising connectivity services, infrastructure, purpose-built IoT platforms, app security, analytics and professional services.

In this effort, both business continuity and Quality of Service (QoS) must be treated as absolutely fundamental. Establishing always-on connectivity is the first critical step. The further challenge is the requirement for an IoT application infrastructure to run quickly and consistently, especially where real-time delivery is required for determining availability and status. Some deployments will be localized to specific smart objects or smart buildings. Others however, will span smart cities, countries and continents and require the automated and real-time analysis of data from thousands or, potentially, hundreds of thousands of devices simultaneously.

See full post

Agile businesses of all sizes need communications partners that can offer flexible, future-proof solutions

do-cli-experts-need-to-worry-about-their-jobs

There is no doubt that the operational and financial appeal of “The Cloud” is gaining more traction each year and across a wider spectrum of businesses, with Gartner[1] predicting that more than half of IT spend will be Cloud related in 2016 and over half of large enterprises having a public/private hybrid Cloud platform by 2017.

What is also evident is that the more the “X-as-a-service” range grows the more the Cloud becomes a compelling and realistic option for mid-size and smaller agile businesses, who see the flexibility it offers not only as a way of controlling costs but also critical in terms of staying competitive by enabling greater alignment between IT consumption and market fluctuations. This pragmatic approach particularly applies to multi-branch organizations where application and data sharing is crucial to the productivity of the business, which otherwise could mean significant IT investment in potentially redundant LAN-based resources and expensive localized support systems.

To derive the full benefit from the Cloud, agile businesses need to engage with equally agile communications service providers (CSPs), which are able to deliver fast and reliable access capable of supporting a broad range of granular, all-IP based services in an exclusively WAN-dependent environment. Using the same argument it follows that agile CSPs need equally agile technology vendor partners, who can help them to respond to the evolving demands of their customers with flexible and scalable products at competitive price-points.

Traditionally, CSPs have had limited choices when it comes to selecting the CPE router devices that provide the access gateway to the Cloud, particularly for the highly competitive and price-sensitive small to mid-range branch office sector. Although the leading router vendors such as Cisco are geared towards the major enterprise market, in the perceived absence of a real alternative these well-known suppliers have typically gone on to become incumbent partners for many CSPs.

However, we are now seeing this trend beginning to break down as CSPs look to gain competitive advantage in a buyers’ market and last year our new generation of multi-service routers, purpose-designed for CSPs, over two quarters out-shipped Cisco in Europe for the smaller, branch office customer sector. These routers not only enable CSPs to offer high performance SLAs but provide a platform for a range of value-added services that can both enhance the user experience and ensure efficient bandwidth provisioning for both data and voice-based, fixed-line and mobile, communications.

See full post

Latest News

  • EKINOPS completes the acquisition of OTN technology from Padtec

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI), a leading supplier of telecommunications solutions for telecom operators, today completes the acquisition of the OTN-Switch (Optical Transport Network) platform developed by Padtec, an optical communications system manufacturer based in Brazil.

     
  • A record 2nd quarter with sequential growth of 17%. H1 2019: revenue of €45 million and expected improvement in EBITDA margin

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI), a leading supplier of telecommunications solutions for telecom operators, has published its revenue for the second quarter of 2019.

     
  • EKINOPS Launches Channel Partner Program in EMEA and APAC

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI), a leading supplier of optical transport equipment and router solutions, today announces the launch of the EKINOPS Channel Partner Program (ECPP). The program has been designed to support value-added resellers (VARs) and system integrators to differentiate in the market by providing them with the opportunity to build, sell and deliver solutions tailored to their customer needs, while still benefitting from the Ekinops’ extensive knowledge, resources and expertise.

     

EKINOPS Worldwide

EKINOPS EMEA & APAC
Telephone +33 (0)1 77 71 12 00

EKINOPS AMERICAS
Telephone +1 (571) 385-4103

 

E-MAIL ALERTS

Receive automatically EKINOPS information in your inbox!