Learn more about the OneAccess portfolio : an extensive range of physical or virtualized access platforms: multi-service routers, Ethernet access devices, white-box CPE and VNFs for the agile delivery of managed enterprise services
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Jan Marien is Product Marketing Manager for Ethernet and Mobile Access products for the OneAccess brand and joined the company in 2006. During his over 25-year career he held positions in engineering, product management and strategy. With a background both from vendor perspective in OneAccess Networks and Integration business with Telindus Networks, he is very much focused on integration and business development of new technologies in service provider access networks worldwide.

Unpacking the technologies behind the Zero-Touch Provisioning of a universal CPE

uCPE

Explore the combination of technologies that enable remote provisioning and management of the uCPE and the VNFs this powerful new device supports.

A Universal Customer Premises Equipment (uCPE) consists of both software and hardware components to create a small virtualization platform at the customer premises and which is capable of running multiple Virtual Network Functions (VNFs) in a local service chain. This is similar to running Virtualized Network Functions in the datacentre but at a smaller scale. This enables Communication Service Providers (CSPs) to disaggregate software and hardware at the CPE level and provides them with unprecedented flexibility to run any type of service on the same commoditized hardware platform.

The services delivered by this programmable end-user device are in general controlled by Next Generation Service Orchestrators, who take care of the service configuration aspects of the delivered services. Another level of Orchestration concerns the deployment of the uCPE in the field. One of the challenges is to minimize its deployment cost using zero-touch provisioning. Pushing a new configuration to a uCPE is more complicated than to legacy CPEs because not only the configuration of the uCPE needs to be pushed to the device, but also the service chaining topology and the VNF images with their initial configurations. Using the NETCONF/YANG protocol however it is possible to push the complete initial configuration to the uCPE including the service chaining configuration and the VNF images with their initial start-up configuration. The initial communication with the provisioning server can be achieved using the NETCONF Call Home functionality, which allows the CPE to identify itself to the provisioning server and receive the correct configuration associated with the customer where the device is installed.

With zero-touch provisioning it is possible to install a uCPE and its configuration in an automated way. In many cases, however, end-to-end orchestration systems don’t support zero-touch provisioning yet or provisioning systems are not in place or sufficiently mature to support this level of automation.

In addition to the OneAccess-branded uCPE hardware (OVP or Open Virtualized Platform) and software (LIM or Local Infrastructure Manager), EKINOPS also offers OneManage to provide a solution for zero-touch provisioning of uCPEs based on a service catalog. OneManage supports a northbound interface to interface with OSS/BSS systems to receive customer-related data associated with a new uCPE deployment. In this way OneManage is an infrastructure orchestrator or sub-orchestrator, taking care of the provisioning of the uCPEs and the management of the installed uCPE base.

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Acceleration techniques for white-box CPEs

acceleration-techniques-for-white-box-cpe

his blog will provide a quick introduction and comparison of some of the available acceleration technologies common on white-box CPE, sometimes also referred to as “universal CPE” or uCPE.

Classical premises equipment has traditionally relied on specialized network processors to deliver network processing performance. Standard x86 hardware however, which was originally designed for more general purpose compute tasks, especially when used together with a “plain vanilla” Linux implementation, will result in disappointing performance levels for data communication purposes unless expensive x86 CPUs are used. To address this concern, a number of software and hardware acceleration techniques have been introduced to meet the performance requirements imposed on today’s CPEs.

The processing context for white-box CPE is an environment that provides a small virtualized infrastructure at the customer premises, where multiple VMs (Virtual Machines) that host VNFs (Virtual Network Functions) are created and hosted in a Linux environment, Service chaining is established between the different VMs, resulting in a final customer service which can be configured and adapted through a customer portal. In this setup VNFs and VMs need to communicate either to the outside world through a NIC (Network Interface Card) or to another VNF for service chaining.

DPDK (Data Plane Development Kit)In the case of white-box CPEs, DPDK provides a framework and set of techniques to accelerate data packet processing and circumvent the bottlenecks encountered in standard Linux processing. DPDK is implemented in software and basically bypasses the Linux kernel and network stack to establish a high-speed data path for rapid packet processing. Its great advantage is to produce significant performance improvements without hardware modifications. Although DPDK was originally developed for Intel-based processor environments, it is now also available on other processors such as ARM.

AES-NI (Advanced Encryption Standard New Instructions)

This is an extension to the x86 instruction set for Intel processors to accelerate the speed of encrypting and decrypting data packets using the AES standard. Without this instruction set, the encryption and decryption process would take a lot more time since it is a very compute-intensive task. The encryption is done at the data plane level and is used to secure data communications over Wide Area Networks.

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The 4Gable Future: Enterprise LTE Goes Far Beyond Corporate Mobility

The 4Gable Future: Enterprise LTE Goes Far Beyond Corporate Mobility

Lift the lid on most ‘LTE in the enterprise’ discussions and it quickly becomes evident that LTE’s corporate mobility ‘revolution’ is in full effect. And rightly so. Dawn has well and truly broken on the IP/GSM-converged age of LTE and time-starved, frequent-flying execs across the world are now basking in the morning rays of the globally-supported, superfast standard.

But enterprise LTE should be about more than ensuring the CEO can get email on their iPad the next time they’re in Japan. What has, arguably, much further reaching implications for today’s enterprise (and has so far, been far less celebrated), is how else LTE can be put to use in the networked enterprise.

When used ‘behind the scenes’, for example, in unison with the organization’s other communications links, such as fiber, DSL and Wi-Fi, LTE has the power to help the entire enterprise WAN raise its game.

This means there are quick wins here for enterprise-focused telecom operators and communication service providers (CSPs), whose fixed line networks are already under strain from network equipment obsolescence and dramatic year-on-year hikes in data volumes. In a market dogged by falling ARPUs and increasingly complex network demands from customers, providers of enterprise WANs should not only welcome the chance to introduce an LTE link to their customers, they should be seizing the opportunity with both hands.

CSPs are perpetually seeking new ways to enhance their network performance, establish competitive differentiation and generate new revenues in order to offset the challenging market conditions. For them, LTE is a serious enabler. It can be used to boost whole-of-network performance, by intelligently load-balancing network traffic during peak usage times, for example, or by accelerating data throughput, or providing a beefier alternative to 3G for wireless backup, enabling a higher level of network performance as a result.

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Latest News

  • EKINOPS Opens New US Office

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI), a leading supplier of optical transport equipment and router solutions for service providers and telecom operators, today announces the opening of new North America Headquarters in Rockville, Maryland, USA.

     
  • EKINOPS and Passman meet demands of “bandwidth hungry” hospitality customers

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI), a leading provider of open and fully interoperable Layer 1, 2 and 3 network solutions, and international hospitality digital service specialists, Passman, today announced the availability of true 1Gb services-enabling routers, which will further enhance quality of service (QoS) delivery for Wi-Fi guest access services.

     
  • EKINOPS Centralizes Metro Ethernet SLA Monitoring & Service Activation for CSPs with new 10G Access Device

    EKINOPS (Euronext Paris - FR0011466069 – EKI), a leading global supplier of telecommunications solutions for operators, today unveils a OneAccess 10G Ethernet Access Device (EAD) that will enable operators and communication service providers to offer high-speed Ethernet services to Enterprise and wholesale customers.

     

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